Six PBIS Examples for Every School

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
Featuring 
Deiera Bennett

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

Six PBIS Examples for Every School

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
Chapter 
 | 
 🚀
 🥤

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

No items found.

Six PBIS Examples for Every School

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
By 
Deiera Bennett
 | 
May 19, 2022
Register Now

About the Event

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

Register Now

About the Event

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

About the Presenter

Deiera Bennett is a freelance EdTech copywriter with a background in marketing and 6 years of experience as an educator. When she’s not writing, you can find her binge-watching The Office for the 5th time, spending time with family, or looking up recipes on Pinterest.

Six PBIS Examples for Every School

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
By 
Deiera Bennett
 | 
May 19, 2022

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Old School Cookout
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Career Day
Grades 3-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Amazing Race
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Food-Themed Party
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Final Fridays
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stairway Messages
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
“Let's Make A Difference Week"
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Game Week
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Career Day
Grades 3-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Deiera Bennett
 

Six PBIS Examples for Every School

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.
By 
Deiera Bennett
 | 
May 19, 2022

PBIS is a behavior management framework that focuses on promoting and encouraging positive behavior.

How does PBIS best practices work?

  • PBIS uses positive behavior interventions to reinforce behavior rather than punish unwanted behavior.
  • PBIS Tiers provide interventions based to groups of students based on their needs.
  • PBIS also focuses on treating the root cause of disruptive behavior to holistically address challenges.

As a result, students receive the support, empathy, and understanding needed to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.

PBIS Examples

To understand what PBIS looks like in action, we’re sharing these six PBIS examples to help inspire the many ways you can implement PBIS in your school. Or if your looking to scale up your program you check out our resources on taking PBIS district-wide.

1. School-Wide Routines

Implement PBIS into your school by establishing straightforward, easy-to-follow routines. When students are unsure about what will happen next, it opens the door for them to get off task or participate in unwanted behaviors. There are lots of opportunities for routines throughout schedule! Think about a morning routine and how it sets the tone for the day: 

The morning bell rings signaling the beginning of the school day followed by the recitation of the pledge over the intercom. Next, the students listen to the daily announcements, learn an SAT Word of the Day, and hear a motivational quote. 

The students know to have their class materials ready by the end of the morning announcements because that’s when the teacher will begin class. In this case, the morning routine sets a positive tone for the day and fills the transition time between when students arrive in class and when instruction begins. 

As an administrator, you can also encourage teachers to create routines within their classrooms and write the routines on the board for students to reference if they forget. If your looking to establish routines for younger students you should try our guide to PBIS in Elementary Schools.

2. Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are fair consequences that are directly related to a specific behavior. They give students the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn from their behavior and develop a deeper understanding of cause and effect. 

Here’s a scenario to help you think about how you can use logical consequences in your school:

Two students are causing a disruption in the classroom by arguing loudly with each other. 

Instead of assigning after-school detention or in-school suspension, give the students a logical consequence. 

Since they wasted class time and disrespected each other by yelling at each other, a logical consequence would be that the students have to spend recess time with the guidance counselor learning about effective communication and conflict resolution. 

In this case, the students have the opportunity to reflect on their actions, learn strategies to improve their communication, and resolve the initial conflict.

3. Positive Environment

Creating a welcoming environment for students doesn’t have to be a tedious task. A few small adjustments can eliminate visual chaos which can help students focus, think more clearly, and improve their mood, resulting in an increase in positive behaviors. 

Ensure the hallways are clean and free of clutter, open windows to let in natural light, and place live plants throughout the school to produce fresh air. 

You can also add personality to the hallways by displaying motivational posters, adding bright paint, and displaying a mural of the school mascot. 

pbis poster

By making the school a more inviting place, you can instill a sense of community into the students can decrease the chances of them intentionally causing disruptions.

4. Tangible Rewards

Tangible rewards are a form of positive reinforcement that encourage students to continue exhibiting the desired behaviors. Tangible rewards can serve as a mirror of how the “real world” works like with a token economy. They can motivate students to exhibit positive behaviors in the same way that paychecks can motivate people to go to work. You can even beef up your Tier 1 System by implementing some classroom rewards.

Tangible rewards should be based on the students’ interests and developmental level and should reasonably align with the desired behavior. For example, stickers would probably be an underwhelming reward for a middle school student who achieved one month of positive behavior, whereas a pair of inexpensive earbuds might excite them. Platforms like LiveSchool make it easy to assign points to behaviors that can be redeemed for tangible rewards. 

5. Clear Expectations

School and classroom expectations can work wonders for promoting positive behavior among students. Some schools choose to make it fun and memorable by using an acronym where each letter stands for the desired positive behavior (for example S stands for Support Others). 

In order to use expectations as a PBIS example, the expectations should emphasize positive behaviors. Focus on the behaviors you want them to exhibit instead of the behaviors you want them to avoid. For example, instead of saying “Don’t throw trash on the floor,” you can say “Throw trash in the trashcan.”

School-wide expectations make it easier for everyone in the school to be on the same page about what behaviors are acceptable and desired. Be sure to include the expectations in parent communication documents such as school welcome letters and the code of conduct. 

Post them throughout the school and encourage teachers to review them frequently. Take it a step further by encouraging your teachers to create and display classroom expectations!

6. Praise

Many attention-seeking behaviors that can cause disruption are often reinforced when school leaders spend more time addressing negative behaviors than praising positive behavior. PBIS encourages educators to get to the root of misbehavior and address it rather than punishing students for the behavior. 

Reinforcing positive behavior encourages students to perform that behavior more frequently, and praise is one form of positive reinforcement that can be effective in all grade levels. 

When using praise as positive reinforcement, be sure to do so consistently. 

A common mistake that educators make is to praise a student who usually misbehaves when they show improvement, but fail to acknowledge the students who consistently exhibit positive behaviors. 

An example of how to do this on a school-wide level is by having a student-of-the-week or student-of-the-month award. Students and staff members can nominate students who display predetermined positive behaviors and good deeds. A name can be chosen at random from the list of nominees to receive a tangible reward, and the other names of the other nominees can be displayed on a poster or bulletin board for everyone to see.

Your Turn

Whether you’re a teacher who wants to use positive behavior support in the classroom or an administrator implementing PBIS on a school-wide level, or you're ready to set up a PBIS Store you can start by using these simple yet effective PBIS examples today. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a peek at our resources on how to start your PBIS program.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Amazing Race
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
“Let's Make A Difference Week"
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Career Day
Grades 3-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY

All Event Ideas for Schools

💰
🎨
The A-List
💰
🎨
Movie Night
💰
🎨
Family Feast
💰
🎨
Blood Drive
💰
🎨
Karaoke Night
💰
🎨
Decades Party
💰
🎨
Silent Disco
💰
🎨
Meet the Teacher
💰
🎨
Fake The Funk
💰
🎨
School Dance
💰
🎨
Meme Party
💰
🎨
Bonfire
💰
🎨
Camp Read Away

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Tutor
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Stairway Messages
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
🎉
👑
🎁
School Assembly
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Wild ‘N Out High School Edition
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
“Let's Make A Difference Week"
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Old School Cookout
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Graduation Celebration
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
School Assembly
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Tutor
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Deiera Bennett
 

Subscribe via Email

Receive the best school culture resources monthly to inspire your planning.

Related Resources

-