The Ultimate Guide to Positive Behavior Support

Positive behavior support is a student management method that builds buy-in for issues like engagement and behavior.
Teaching during the last couple of years for most educators has not been easy, to say the least. There has been a constant uptick in negative behaviors, disengagement, and an overall lack of excitement by students to learn in the class.
Featuring 
Justin McElwee

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

The Ultimate Guide to Positive Behavior Support

Positive behavior support is a student management method that builds buy-in for issues like engagement and behavior.
Chapter 
 | 
 🚀
 🥤

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

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The Ultimate Guide to Positive Behavior Support

Positive behavior support is a student management method that builds buy-in for issues like engagement and behavior.
By 
Justin McElwee
 | 
March 25, 2022
Register Now

About the Event

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

Register Now

About the Event

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

About the Presenter

Justin has been an educator for over a decade including various teaching roles ranging from Special Education, ELA, and Social Studies! When he's not busy, he enjoys spending time with his family including his daughter, his wife, and his half labrador/half dachshund, "Mac."

In addition to this you can find him working on his podcast production skills for his goofy sports and pop culture podcast, Baseball and Whatever, playing ice hockey, water skiing, or playing video games. He's probably playing video games.

The Ultimate Guide to Positive Behavior Support

Positive behavior support is a student management method that builds buy-in for issues like engagement and behavior.
By 
Justin McElwee
 | 
March 25, 2022

Teaching during the last couple of years for most educators has not been easy, to say the least. There has been a constant uptick in negative behaviors, disengagement, and an overall lack of excitement by students to learn in the class.

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

All Reward Ideas for Students

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♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
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Privilege
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Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
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Event
Free
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Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
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Free
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TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
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Free
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Meme Party
Grades 6-12
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Event
Free
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Extra Recess
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Free
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Line Leader
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
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Donate $1
Grades 3-12
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Privilege
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School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
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Free Dress
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Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
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Event
Deluxe
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Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
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Low Cost/DIY
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Teacher for the Day
Grades 6-12
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Privilege
Free
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Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
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Board Game Party
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Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
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Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

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Tech Time
Grades 3-12
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Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
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Low Cost/DIY
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Learn more about the author, 
Justin McElwee
 

The Ultimate Guide to Positive Behavior Support

Positive behavior support is a student management method that builds buy-in for issues like engagement and behavior.
By 
Justin McElwee
 | 
March 25, 2022

Teaching during the last couple of years for most educators has not been easy, to say the least. There has been a constant uptick in negative behaviors, disengagement, and an overall lack of excitement by students to learn in the class.

The good news is that this can be improved and worked on by implementing positive behavior support models. If you’re wondering what you can do to remedy your school climate situation, then look no further! Not only will they improve your students' attitude within the building, but it can also help improve school morale and the overall atmosphere.

What Is Positive Behavior Support?

Positive behavior support is a method that can be introduced into the school environment in order to get buy-in from students on a variety of issues like engagement, behavior, and more.

It’s important to start it as early as possible to increase the amount of positive engagement from students. Ideally, this would be a great entry point at the beginning of a school year, quarter, trimester, or return from a break. All of these time frames allow all students to come in, learn what is required of them, and then demonstrate it successfully. You could even create a cohort with the other schools in your district by taking PBIS district-wide.

Positive Behavior Support Model

One of the most important aspects of positive behavior support is to develop a clear set of expectations and a clear set of areas where improvement that will be targeted.

Ideally, it would be beneficial to try and target no more than five concerns before moving on to other topics. I would recommend keeping them broad so that a variety of behaviors can slot into them. A great way to start would be to choose these four traits.

Listed below are four basic traits you can target:

  • Be Responsible
  • Be Respectful
  • Be Engaged
  • Be Safe

Let's dive into each.

Be Responsible

Let’s focus on what it means to “be responsible.” This is a trait or concept that can be applied to all areas of the building.

Being responsible could be that a student brings their proper supplies to the classroom.

If a student is in the hall, being responsible might look like staying to the right and not pushing. This is a broad concept that works because it can be applied elsewhere.

Be Respectful

If we look at “be respectful,” this too applies to a variety of areas. Within the classroom, being respectful would be following directions or raising a hand if you have a question.

Be Engaged

“Be engaged” would also work in a multitude of locations within the school environment. Perhaps the lunchroom “be engaged” would be to stay at your table and wait to throw away your food until you're dismissed.

Be Safe

Lastly, “be safe” also would be used around the building too. Being safe could be everything from keeping your materials under your desk to prevent people from being tripped, or not running in the hallway.

Positive Behavior Support Strategies

Set Expectations

The first component of positive behavior support is to set expectations (as mentioned above) and guidelines for your students. This can be done in a variety of ways.

For example, you can create both digital and physical posters that can serve as reminders to your student body. These posters should include the expectations that are required for that particular area of the school. They can be hung up throughout the school environment that explain what expectations are for the hallway, the classroom, the bathroom, and more.

Review Expectations

It is also essential to review these expectations with students on a regular basis when they are first starting. Repeating such guidelines in the morning announcements is also a great way to give multiple exposures of them to the student body.

Give Points

Once the expectations have been taught (and retaught!) students must be rewarded for meeting these requirements and rising above them. This too can be done in a variety of ways.

An efficient method to reinforce these expectations would be to create a “caught being good” reward token. When students are staying engaged with a lesson or going above and beyond to participate, they can then receive a ticket reward to demonstrate this.

Celebrate With Rewards

The purpose of a rewards ticket doesn’t stop there though. There must be additional classroom rewards in place to honor that ticket. The ticket must warrant something, otherwise, it’s just a simple piece of paper.

While some students might have that intrinsic motivation to work towards the positivity from their educator, others might need something that is more tangible.

The reason students will want to buy into this process is because of a reward or bonus that is available to them for turning in something like a reward ticket. For example, it could be an idea as large as getting to participate with staff at a school assembly or being given a gift card or treat individually.

You can also allow the students to submit their “tickets” into a raffle drawing that takes place every week. Teachers can then draw tickets so that students can be rewarded with gift cards or prizes depending on what they’d like to receive.

There is a tremendous amount of excitement at the end of the week on a Friday, when the intercom comes on and the students wait to hear if their name was drawn.

Another unique way to draw the tickets would be to film it and then send it out through the school email so students can watch it at the end of the week if time permits. n addition to this there are many other methods that could be used. Ice cream treats, lunch with a teacher, special privileges for a whole class, and many others are quick easy ways to reward positive behavior that will continue to keep students engaged with the positive behavior support system.

These are all a relatively low-cost way to increase student participation in the positive behavior support system.

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Everyone

By following PBIS best practices you can create behavior systems that build and foster a collaborative environment between both teacher and student. Students know that teachers are looking for moments to reward them with these systems in place.

Because of this, the student will attempt to meet the challenge and rise to the level that is required of them so that a positive environment is created. There is nothing better for our students than to know that their teachers are looking out for them. Together, they can work together to improve engagement or minimize disruptive behavior.

If a student knows that their teacher has their best interest in their heart (and is ready to reward them) then amazing moments can take place in education!

Working with younger students? Try our resources on PBIS in Elementary Schools. Or if your new to behavior support you should take a look at our resources on creating a PBIS Store or even how to start your PBIS program.

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Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Justin McElwee
 

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