How to Implement PBIS Across Your District

How to implement programs with consistency across your district, while maintaining the individual school cultures.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
August 3, 2022

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

Implementing a program of any kind in any school takes tremendous planning. In that plan, some consideration for change management is necessary if your program is going to succeed. This is especially true of behavior management programs and school culture initiatives.

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

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These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

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About the Event

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

Register Now

About the Event

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

About the Presenter

Jordan resides in Lexington, Kentucky. He has experience in Public Education as an Administrator, Science Teacher, and as a Coach. He has extensive experience with School Discipline, PBIS, SEL, Restorative Practices, MTSS, and Trauma-Informed Care.

Implementing a program of any kind in any school takes tremendous planning. In that plan, some consideration for change management is necessary if your program is going to succeed. This is especially true of behavior management programs and school culture initiatives.

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Night
Grades 9-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Recess
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Old School Cookout
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Theme Party
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Firebird of the Month
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

💰
🎨
Amazing Race
💰
🎨
Meet the Teacher
💰
🎨
Blood Drive
💰
🎨
Family Feast
💰
🎨
Bonfire
💰
🎨
Silent Disco
💰
🎨
The Love Soiree
💰
🎨
Fake The Funk
💰
🎨
Camp Read Away
💰
🎨
Music Fest

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
🎉
👑
🎁
Line Leader
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Game Week
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holiday Classroom Carousel
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Game-Based Simulation Learning
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Graduation Celebration
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Serenade
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Sweatshirt
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Tutor
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Teacher Serenade
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Extra Recess
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
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Implementing a program of any kind in any school takes tremendous planning. In that plan, some consideration for change management is necessary if your program is going to succeed. This is especially true of behavior management programs and school culture initiatives.

These are topics that have a deep impact on the day-to-day of your staff and students and require efforts from all levels to succeed. Without everyone on board, your program will have inconsistencies that will undermine credibility and progress. 

You need buy-in.

Difficult, but most of us can see a path to success in our school or department if we evaluate our current situation accurately. You know the key player(s) you need to create that buy-in on a small scale. But what if it's more than just your school? How do you implement change across many schools? 

How do you account for the differences in the schools and provide the consistency your district needs? They aren’t all the same. They are of different sizes and often tasked with different purposes as most larger districts offer a host of special programs in addition to their traditional schools.

Even those that are set up to be similar in size, grade, and population will develop their own unique culture as the buildings take on the personality and customs of those of us who occupy them. That uniqueness is what makes them special. 

So how do you implement programs with consistency across your district, while still maintaining the local school cultures your staff and students have developed? You need to rely on PBIS best practices to guide your work.

About Kim Wood And Placer County

Placer County, California is home to 16 unique school districts. Kim Wood is a behavior specialist and PBIS Coach for the Placer County Office of Education. She is tasked with leading behavioral support programs consistent from a fundamental perspective but also adaptable to the unique needs of the individual schools she oversees. 

The schools that Kim serves aren’t just different due to location, they also vary in the levels of support necessary as she specializes in supporting Alternative Education Programs, and K-12 students in Court Schools, Community Schools, and Charter Programs. 

Kim has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over 25 years, with experiences including implementing intensive early intervention programs for children with autism, setting up behaviorally-based classrooms, utilizing organizational behavior management strategies to improve systems and staff performance, consulting with general and special education classrooms on global behavior management strategies, and coaching teams on the implementation of positive behavior intervention plans.

Kim is tasked with the scenario we mentioned above, she provides PBIS interventions to a wide range of schools that all have unique school culture and varying needs for support.

How does PBIS work from a District Perspective?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to disruptive behavior in your building. PBIS tiers are designed to differentiate the level of support your students need. 

By creating a tiered system of discipline you can efficiently sort teacher-managed and office-managed issues. You can reduce and optimize your student support staff's workload so they can dedicate their time to the students most in need of support. By reducing behavior incidents and systemizing your responses you can create a positive culture for both staff and students.

To implement this at the district level as Kim does you need to provide consistent guidelines but also allow some flexibility within schools so they can mold the program to fit their needs.

Your kids need the program. Your staff needs support and consistency. But you need buy-in from both to make it work.

District-Wide Support and Consistency

Change is difficult for any district and it requires certain components from a leadership perspective in order to succeed. The basic pieces have to be present and they have to be strong in every building. According to Kim, those components are:

  • Expectations that empower a growth mindset
  • A system to collect behavior data
  • A process to analyze that data and make informed decisions
  • The willingness and support to change course when something isn’t working

Those 4 components can and should be universal in your school district if you wish for your PBIS strategies to have a real impact on student success. 

Every school should design its expectations in a manner that promotes student growth past those expectations. This can be accomplished with support, training, and guidance from the district office. That support should include:

  • A District Cohort of PBIS Coaches
  • Professional Development opportunities year-round
  • Regular site visits by a district-level leader in a support capacity

All of your schools need a system to monitor the effectiveness of your program. This could be through office discipline referrals. Or you can do as PCOE has and provide your schools with a tool that they can use to dig deeper into the root of your behavior concerns like LiveSchool. The data you mine should include but not be limited to:

  • Who: student demographics 
  • What: types of behavior infractions
  • When: day and time of events
  • Where: location of events
  • And How often: frequency of events

The last component is a cultural norm. Do you encourage innovation or stifle it? It seems counterintuitive to list a willingness to change as a universal norm but it certainly is. As part of your regular business you need to:

  • Allow building-level staff to share and learn from each other
  • Model productive data conversations from a growth perspective
  • Recognize innovations and adaptations that are successful

You need to trust and empower the school-level leaders to course-correct if necessary and provide support to brainstorm local solutions when called upon.

School Level Values and Culture Alignment

So we discussed the things that should remain consistent across your district. How do we custom-fit programs to the schools they are meant to serve? Kim has 4 suggestions for that as well:

  • Align your expectations to the values and culture of the school.
  • Collect and implement student and family input into the plan
  • Normalize the recognition of behavior problems BEFORE they start
  • Provide student choice within your reward systems

Each individual school has its own values and culture. Compose the expectations in a way that resonates with the audience it is meant for. What does it take for a student to be successful at that specific school? Think about areas like transportation, dress code, and building logistics.

It won’t be the same everywhere, and it shouldn’t be. Unique buildings have unique populations and therefore unique needs. Tailor your support to fit those needs.

Every school will benefit from increased communication and input with the families and students they serve. If you get buy-in from local families your school can thrive through tough times. If you don’t, you create a wall that makes it easy to criticize and pull your community apart.

The staff in a school are rarely surprised when something doesn’t go well with their students. They normally see it coming. Normalize pre-corrections as a way to minimize behavioral concerns. You don’t want a “gotcha” culture. It creates division unnecessarily. 

If you remind students of specific expectations in situations you know they are likely to struggle, you decrease the likelihood of the behavior. This is unique to the local school because the staff knows the strengths and sore spots of their students. 

Different things trigger behavior events in different schools and lean on the local leadership to minimize those behaviors.

Within every PBIS program, you need to have a reward system. Those rewards shouldn’t be universal across all schools. They should be tailored to motivate and praise the students in the community they are implemented in. You should customize your PBIS Store to fit the unique culture of your school.

PBIS & Districts

All schools face the challenge of managing high levels of behavioral needs while providing effective support to every student.

And we know, this isn't an easy task, especially in a year when behavior incidents have increased.

But a district that implements a PBIS behavior plan can increase engagement, decrease discipline-related events, and build strong cultures within the local school's communities.

To accomplish this districts need to follow a model similar to Placer County’s as they provide the necessary consistency across all programs while still encouraging local innovation and cultural differentiation. If you're looking to start on a smaller scale check out our resources for how to start your PBIS program.

Or if your in a younger setting you can utilize our resources centered around PBIS in Elementary Schools. Want to learn all you can possibly learn about PBIS? Check out our Complete PBIS Field Guide.

Looking for a place to start your school culture journey? Check out our free PBIS template where you can download a sample to get started.

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