The PBIS Interventions Every Educator Needs to Know

Here are some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework.
Classroom behavior is one of the many things teachers must be able to manage efficiently on a daily basis. Without a strong hold on classroom management, academics can be drastically affected.
Featuring 
Katie Neumeier

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

The PBIS Interventions Every Educator Needs to Know

Here are some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework.
Chapter 
 | 
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 🥤

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

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The PBIS Interventions Every Educator Needs to Know

Here are some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework.
By 
Katie Neumeier
 | 
August 25, 2022
Register Now

About the Event

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

Register Now

About the Event

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

About the Presenter

Katherine Neumeier has spent the last 8 years in education working with Title I schools to build strong classroom practices and close academic gaps with English Language Learners and Special Populations. She has taught across multiple grade levels as well as coached educators, served as a reading specialist, and built an intervention program from the ground up. Integrating EdTech platforms as well as utilizing behavior management tools such as Liveschool have transformed and supported her role as an educator. She earned a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's University and a M.Ed from The University of St. Thomas.

The PBIS Interventions Every Educator Needs to Know

Here are some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework.
By 
Katie Neumeier
 | 
August 25, 2022

Classroom behavior is one of the many things teachers must be able to manage efficiently on a daily basis. Without a strong hold on classroom management, academics can be drastically affected.

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

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Katie Neumeier
 

The PBIS Interventions Every Educator Needs to Know

Here are some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework.
By 
Katie Neumeier
 | 
August 25, 2022

Classroom behavior is one of the many things teachers must be able to manage efficiently on a daily basis. Without a strong hold on classroom management, academics can be drastically affected.

Research on classroom management and effective behavioral interventions suggests that a system called PBIS leads to better student behavior overall. So what is PBIS and why should schools be using it as their prime behavioral initiative? 

What is PBIS? 

PBIS stands for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. It is a set of ideas, tools, and strategies that schools use to promote positive behavior and build dynamic school culture. Unlike many punitive behavioral systems, PBIS is a proactive, strategic approach. 

Instead of relying on consequences for disruptive behavior, it supports the explicit teaching of the desired behaviors to students and reinforces these behaviors positively. 

The PBIS system fits into a three-tiered framework. 

  • Tier 1 consists of the strategies that reach most learners in the typical K-12 classroom. 
  • Tier 2 contains more specific, monitored interventions that serve the needs of students who need some extra support. 
  • Tier 3 includes the most intensive interventions created for students who have distinct needs as observed by behavior professionals. 

In using PBIS tiers, the desired outcome is that eventually, most students are able to learn and thrive in the Tier 1 setting.

Why Use PBIS? 

Schools have dozens of options when it comes to choosing a behavior system for their learning environment. PBIS strategies stand out because of the many benefits they offers educators and students alike. 

One prime benefit is that it was masterfully created with all students in mind. The main focus of the system is to teach and promote positive behavior across the board. 

Classroom teachers are trained on Tier 1 best practices and they use these strategies to support all students. Due to its inclusive nature, students who have more complex behavioral needs do not feel excluded. Instead, interventions are offered to them not only on the Tier 1 level but on Tier 2 or Tier 3 levels as well. 

This, in turn, helps to build a dynamic school culture. Other benefits include…

● Improving and building social-emotional skills 

● Increasing student engagement 

● Allowing a focus on academic instruction 

● Flexibility 

Let’s look at some effective interventions that are used within the PBIS framework. They are divided into sections and will show you the progression of interventions used from Tier 1 (universal) to Tier 3 (most intensive). 

Examples of PBIS Interventions 

Tier 1 PBIS Interventions

1. Explicitly Teach & Model Positive Behaviors

A common misconception is that routines, procedures, and behavior expectations are only taught at the beginning of the year. 

Positive behavior should be explicitly taught at the beginning, but then also needs to be reinforced consistently throughout the entire school year. The more you talk about, model, and reinforce good behavior, the faster students will naturally show it. 

2. Give Tangible Rewards 

(Tied to a Point System like LiveSchool) 

PBIS works best when classroom behaviors are tied to a point and reward system. This means that when students exhibit a desired behavior, they earn points (immediate reinforcers) that can then be exchanged for tangible rewards. 

Platforms like LiveSchool help teachers and students keep track of points until enough is earned for rewards from a class or school store. This intervention is perfect for Tier 1 because rewards can be differentiated, which allows for further student choice. 

3. Use Non-Verbal Cues & Signals 

Verbal cues and reinforcing language are important but are not the only ways you can encourage positive behavior. Teaching non-verbal cues or signals to students will help to re-engage learners quickly and with minimal distraction.

Not all students respond well to verbal redirects, especially if they are used consistently. Non-verbals are a perfect alternative and work well for all students. 

4. Positively Narrate 

Classroom narration is not a natural skill but a powerful one. Teachers should use positive narration to proactively encourage good behaviors before students even begin following an instruction. 

The great thing about the narration is it can be used at any time in a lesson or unstructured moment, like in the hallway or transition. If students watch teachers observe them and hear positive affirmations, they are more apt to meet the expectation. 

Tier 2 PBIS Interventions

5. Provide a Check-In & Check-Out 

This Tier 2 intervention requires student-specific goals and a person who is able to complete the check-in and check-out on a daily basis. It is also important for the person chosen to have a strong relationship with the Tier 2 student. 

Every morning before school, the teacher meets with their student(s) to review their goals for the day and see how they are doing. This 1:1 conversation will normally help students to start their day on the right foot. 

At the end of the day, the same teacher will meet with their student(s) to go over the highs and lows of the day. Teachers can also use this time to reward great behavior or have more reflective conversations. 

6. Offer Structured Breaks 

Both teachers and students benefit from breaks throughout the day. Some students though need more breaks than others in order to reset and re-engage in classroom learning. 

Structured breaks are planned periods of time in which Tier 2 behavior students are able to step away and reset themselves. Students with the ability to self-monitor can eventually move from structured, timed breaks to requested ones. 

7. Implement Skill Builders 

As teachers identify their Tier 2 behavior students, similar skill gaps may become evident. Skill Builder Interventions would work well in this case because these students would be able to meet in a small group at a designated time during the week. 

Here, they will learn specific skills that will help them meet their behavior goals. These skill builder groups could focus on social-emotional topics or help students to build relationships. This intervention is extremely flexible and can be implemented by teachers or counselors, depending on teacher availability. 

Tier 3 PBIS Interventions

8. Daily Behavior Forms 

This intervention is for students who need more consistent touch points than a check-in/check-out system would provide. The highest leverage goal is chosen and a form is made that reflects the student’s daily class schedule. 

For younger kids, there could be smiley faces next to each period whereas, for older students, there could be a number system. After each class period, the teacher would fill out the form to share if the student met their goal or did not. 

A restorative conversation could then be had earlier in the day if the goal was not met to help students get back on track before moving into their next class. 

9. Offer Sensory Tools 

Though this intervention is more commonly used with students that have ADHD, anxiety, or autism, it can also be used as a Tier 3 intervention for undiagnosed students. 

The usage of a sensory tool requires a specific need to be fulfilled, so it will take extra observation and time to determine what will work best. Commonly used sensory tools are flexible seating, rubber pencil grips, and textured items like sandpaper or velcro strips.

Before introducing a sensory tool, teachers should teach students how to use the tool and create boundaries around it. 

10. Create Individualized and Visual Schedules

Though most students catch on and are able to follow a daily schedule easily, some students cannot. This intervention works well for students who need an even more detailed plan. 

An individualized schedule can be paired with a check-in/check-out system as well as a behavior plan. The consistent 1:1 check-ins throughout the day as well as a more visual schedule will ensure students are able to stay on track and reset when necessary. 

Putting it all together

PBIS is a proactive, strategic framework that promotes positive behavior and supports all students in the classroom. Behavior intervention is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to serving students and helping them learn and grow every day. 

As you look forward to the coming school year, be sure to consider implementing PBIS and some of these interventions to better your school culture and environment.

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Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Theme Party
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
🎉
👑
🎁
Parking Spots
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Bonfire
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Graduation Celebration
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
School Assembly
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Wild ‘N Out High School Edition
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Dance
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Tutor
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Extra Recess
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
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Learn more about the author, 
Katie Neumeier
 

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