How To Infuse PBIS Into Your Behavior Plan

How to infuse PBIS into your discipline plan and think more about consequences and less about punishments.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
October 26, 2022

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

If you work in schools it is very likely you chose to do so because your own school experience was very positive. This could have been because you were an outstanding student.

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

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Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

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About the Event

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

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About the Event

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

About the Presenter

Jordan resides in Lexington, Kentucky. He has experience in Public Education as an Administrator, Science Teacher, and as a Coach. He has extensive experience with School Discipline, PBIS, SEL, Restorative Practices, MTSS, and Trauma-Informed Care.

If you work in schools it is very likely you chose to do so because your own school experience was very positive. This could have been because you were an outstanding student.

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

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Learn more about the author, 
Jordan Pruitt
 

If you work in schools it is very likely you chose to do so because your own school experience was very positive. This could have been because you were an outstanding student.

Maybe school was where you were introduced to your first mentor. Maybe you excelled in music. Or Art. Or were the ace pitcher on the baseball team or the point guard of the basketball team or the captain of the chess team. 

Maybe school was your safe refuge from a tough home environment. Regardless, you probably joined the education field because school was a positive influence or a key turning point in your life. 

On that same note, I doubt you got into education because of some fond memory of a punishment you received for an infraction in your youth. So how can we as the current generation of educators pass on that positive impact to the next generation and still hope to keep schools safe and orderly during what is easy to describe as tough times for school discipline? 

We need to infuse PBIS interventions into our discipline plan and think more about consequences over punishments. As the old saying goes; relationships over rigor.

What is PBIS in Schools?

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive approach to behavior in your building. PBIS is a tiered system of supports designed to differentiate between the level of support your students need. 

It follows a cycle of teaching expectations, progress monitoring, rewarding those who meet expectations, and reteaching those expectations. 

What is a PBIS Behavior Plan?

For PBIS to work as a behavior plan, it needs to be more than rewards for good behavior. This is the complaint that is common amongst detractors, that you're merely bribing for good behavior. If that is as far as your PBIS plan goes, then the detractors aren’t wrong. 

The progress monitoring needs to have an actionable process built-in. In other words, when you look at your data do you have solutions to improve your problem areas? When students do not meet expectations, what is your process? 

What if it’s a large infraction, like a fight?

Obviously, they miss out on a reward and that will curb a lot of behaviors. But not all. If two students are going to fight, the pizza party at the end of the month might not prevent that from happening. 

So if that event does occur, what are you going to do about it? 

Let's use this altercation between two students to discuss a few ways in which PBIS could be infused into your deterrence, response, and review of the incident.

PBIS Behavior Plan Examples

1. Deterrence

As part of your plan you should consider utilizing a Social-Emotional Learning component in your curriculum. Good SEL programs will discuss conflict resolution strategies that the students could utilize to prevent the situation from becoming physical. 

2. Response

As far as consequences go I advise using solutions that serve two main purposes; keeping everyone safe and preventing the situation from happening again.

This could mean a lot of different things to your school and the situation. Behavior consequences are something I’ll write more about in the future. But my recommendation in the aftermath of a conflict like this one between two students is that mediation needs to be at least a part of the solution. 

No matter what else you decide, you need to provide an opportunity for the students to squash the situation in a controlled civil environment. 

3. Review

How did this event occur? Where? When? Do you have proper supervision in  the area? One thing that has held true for each school I have served, staff and students both know where the altercations happen. 

There is normally a “hot spot” of discipline events. By this, I mean a physical location, a time of day, or both. As part of your PBIS behavior plan, you need to know if something like this could be prevented by a logistical solution. Can we add supervision to the spot? Can we divert hallway traffic to ease congestion in the area? 

Your data reviews should reveal patterns. And one thing you'll find over time is that there are always patterns. Sometimes the simplest solution is something that is fairly simple but wouldn’t be noticeable without your data review. 

For example, one year we saw an odd frequency of events happening in a specific hallway at a specific time. Upon further review we realized that this was largely happening as our freshman exited lunch, the next group had to pass them in the hallway to get to the cafe. 

We greatly reduced the infractions by simply changing the route to lunch to allow for a less congested hallway at the time. Easy fix, but I wouldn’t have been able to pitch the idea without the data to prove my solution was necessary.

PBIS Behavior Plan

How to Write Your PBIS Behavior Plan

In addition to building your PBIS plan, you need to look at behavior in the 3 areas I mentioned above. How can you deter issues? Your expectations, SEL, and supervision plan should eliminate most problems.  

Train your staff on how to positively intervene with small infractions so as not to escalate. How will you respond? Your protocols need to be solution-oriented. Does this event bring the safety of my building into question? 

Does my protocol allow me to search for the cause of the behavior? It needs to be if you're going to prescribe a solution to improve or prevent the behavior in the future. Remember that your students are students, not behaviors. Behavior is something they do, not who they are. 

Lastly, you need to make sure your review process allows for data-informed decision-making. If you're not prone to creative solutions, be certain someone on your team is.

Change in school is hard. Look strongly at your process and capacity for change before making any wholesale changes. Build slowly, and build momentum if you want your plan to succeed. 

Building PBIS into your discipline plan needs to reach much farther than the principal’s desk. A positive approach to school behavior is a full community effort.

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Grades 6-12
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Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Game-Based Simulation Learning
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Amazing Race
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Backpack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Music Fest
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holiday Delivery
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher for the Day
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Line Leader
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

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