Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies Your School Needs

Positive behavioral strategies improve, not punish, behavior. It's a more effective consequence for your school's behavior challenges.
What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve the behavior?
Featuring 
Jordan Pruitt

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies Your School Needs

Positive behavioral strategies improve, not punish, behavior. It's a more effective consequence for your school's behavior challenges.
Chapter 
 | 
 🚀
 🥤

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

No items found.

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies Your School Needs

Positive behavioral strategies improve, not punish, behavior. It's a more effective consequence for your school's behavior challenges.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
July 12, 2022
Register Now

About the Event

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

Register Now

About the Event

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

About the Presenter

Jordan resides in Lexington, Kentucky. He has experience in Public Education as an Administrator, Science Teacher, and as a Coach. He has extensive experience with School Discipline, PBIS, SEL, Restorative Practices, MTSS, and Trauma-Informed Care.

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies Your School Needs

Positive behavioral strategies improve, not punish, behavior. It's a more effective consequence for your school's behavior challenges.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
July 12, 2022

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve the behavior?

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Assembly
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Bonfire
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holiday Classroom Carousel
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
School Assembly
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

💰
🎨
Glow Party
💰
🎨
Amazing Race
💰
🎨
School Dance
💰
🎨
Karaoke Night
💰
🎨
Silent Disco
💰
🎨
Music Fest
💰
🎨
Theme Party
💰
🎨
Camp Read Away
💰
🎨
Art Contest
💰
🎨
Trunk or Treat

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Meme Party
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Class Book
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Jordan Pruitt
 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies Your School Needs

Positive behavioral strategies improve, not punish, behavior. It's a more effective consequence for your school's behavior challenges.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
July 12, 2022

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve the behavior?

What is our goal when we assign consequences for disciplinary infractions? Is it punishment? Is it to make a point? Is it to send a message? Or is it to improve disruptive behavior

That subtle mindset shift is very beneficial to students' future success. Consequences focus on improving not punishing. 

Positive Behavioral Intervention Strategies

So how do you assign consequences or interventions that improve the behavior going forward? More importantly, how do you create buy-in with students and staff so they understand the goals behind your actions? 

This takes a bit of creativity and often can take more time than traditional consequences. But when done with fidelity these types of interventions will reduce behavior infractions and thus reduce behavior referrals over time. 

Keep reading for a list of examples and how best to implement them in your school.

1. Restorative Circles

If you are seeing classroom disruptions and conflicts on a regular basis, you need to provide some tools for your staff to work through those issues in the room. 

If you can create a culture of empathy and respect in the classroom, you will reduce the need for an administrator to resolve every dispute. 

I suggest you train your staff on the power of restorative circles. They provide a structured system for the teacher to facilitate tough discussions in the classroom. 

If done well, you create a community atmosphere in the classroom and this will allow students to talk through issues before they need to become office-managed issues.

2. Own Your Actions

When you process a discipline referral, how does that conversation go? Do you read the referral, then check the chart and assign consequences based on the infraction? Or do you talk through the issue with the student and promote empathy and ownership? 

I suggest utilizing Restorative Questions when you have these conversations. Try asking the student these questions:

  • What happened?
  • What were you thinking at the time?
  • What have you thought about since?
  • Who has been affected by your actions? How?
  • How can you make it right?

The goal behind this line of questioning is for the student to accept ownership of their actions and then take an active part in deciding the best course of action going forward. 

The key to success here is that the referring staff understands the process you are carrying out. Everyone needs training on this process, whether they process referrals or not.

3. Mediation

We want our students to learn to solve disputes with words, not with violence. Establish a process for students to have 1v1 discussions to resolve situations before they spiral out of control. 

If an infraction has already been committed, I’ll often reduce the punitive consequences if both parties agree to mediation with one of our counselors or mental health professionals. 

The key to success here is that both students are willing to participate and that your staff sets very clear ground rules on who is to speak and when. Let them know that speaking or behaving combatively will lead to the mediation ending and the full consequences being issued to both students. 

Not all mediations are going to be successful, and that is OK! If there is a chance we can resolve the situation calmly with our words, we need to provide an attempt for our students to do so. 

Guide them to compromise if one is available. This works best in situations where both students should own some responsibility in their actions.

4. Behavioral Groups

If you are seeing a common infraction amongst multiple students sometimes the best course of action is to provide targeted support to those students in the form of behavioral groups. 

This is largely how we address our Tier 2 students at my school. We have boys groups and girls groups. We lean on our student support staff for most of these but sometimes outside professionals are brought in to address issues. 

Many times these services can be provided at no cost because there are often volunteers from within your community who wish to help at-risk youth. Don’t be afraid to seek help, our communities must rally behind these kids.

5. Breakfast Club

My favorite consequences are the ones that don’t disrupt class time. If I must assign detention of some sort I prefer for students to serve outside of the instructional blocks if the situation warrants it. 

At my school, we took this idea a step further and added a counseling aspect to this. Our SAFE room (In-School Suspension) teacher is amazing at talking to students about their problems and working through solutions. 

So we began to utilize the morning as a time to assign her 1 student a day. This has been very successful as it allows the student to serve the punishment time, not miss class time, and work through the problem that actually led to the consequence. 

I credit this solution with being a key component of moving some of our TIer 2 students back into Tier 1.

6. Mentor

Every single student in your school should have a staff member they feel comfortable going to if they have an issue. It can be a teacher, coach, admin, counselor, custodian, or an office worker. But they need someone they can approach if something isn’t right. 

Very often, students with repeated disciplinary problems don’t feel like they have an ally in the school. So one solution to that problem is to give them one! 

Find somebody on your staff that the student can relate to on some level. Then ask the staff member to do daily or weekly check-ins with the student.

This can be formal like a check-in/check-out program or just enough informal conversations to provide the student with some much-needed support. 

You’ll find before long that the student seeks out their mentor instead of acting out. That is progress!

7. The Five R’s 

I like for staff to remember the Five R’s of restorative solutions when they are dealing with behavioral issues:

  1. Relationships
  2. Respect
  3. Responsibility
  4. Repair
  5. Reintegration

If those are the principles that guide your school discipline policies then your staff-student interactions will be more positive overall and you’ll see far fewer referrals.

Set Expectations With Positive Behavioral Interventions

Teach and reteach your expectations. This is the foundation that makes up quality PBIS best practices in any school. Don’t get frustrated when students fail to meet expectations that you haven’t taught. If they do meet expectations, you're gonna need some rewards that rock to make your reward system go.

What do all of these have in common? They are relationship based solutions. They require the practitioner to be creative when assigning solutions. And most of all they tend to emphasize developing empathy amongst your students. If you can teach students that their actions affect other people, and they must take ownership of that, you can drastically reduce your disciplinary problems. If your looking to take these concepts a step further you should check out our resources PBIS in Elementary Schools or on taking PBIS District-wide. Or if you'd like to start on a smaller scale we also have resources on how to start your PBIS program.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Wild ‘N Out High School Edition
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Read Across America
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book
🎉
👑
🎁
Tutor
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stairway Messages
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Parking Spots
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Night
Grades 9-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Amazing Race
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Old School Cookout
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Fake The Funk
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Final Fridays
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Food-Themed Party
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Theme Party
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Silly School Leader
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Extra Recess
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Jordan Pruitt
 

Subscribe via Email

Receive the best school culture resources monthly to inspire your planning.

Related Resources

-