How to Create Your Classroom Management Plan

A classroom management plan directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment.
By 
Dr. Joan Jackson
 | 
May 3, 2022

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

This morning, Gina decided to visit her sister. Gina must drive to New Orleans from her home in Chicago. In her planning, she routed her trip, calculated how many fueling stops she would need to make, and evaluated the time it would take to travel.

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

quote icon

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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About the Event

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

Register Now

About the Event

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

About the Presenter

Dr. Joan Jackson is an educator with over 30 years of experience teaching English to special needs, ESL, and general education students. Her teaching interests lie in museum education and arts integration. Additionally, she has worked in teacher training and coaching as a university professor. Dr. Jackson earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Georgia in journalism, a master's degree in secondary curriculum and instruction from Howard University, and a doctorate in educational leadership from George Mason University.

This morning, Gina decided to visit her sister. Gina must drive to New Orleans from her home in Chicago. In her planning, she routed her trip, calculated how many fueling stops she would need to make, and evaluated the time it would take to travel.

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

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This morning, Gina decided to visit her sister. Gina must drive to New Orleans from her home in Chicago. In her planning, she routed her trip, calculated how many fueling stops she would need to make, and evaluated the time it would take to travel.

Just like Gina has planned her trip, educators need to plan how to manage their classroom environment. Classroom management models serve as an educator’s road map.

What is a classroom management plan?

Just as lesson plans guide the instructional delivery of a lesson, the classroom management plan facilitates the instructional atmosphere. 

A classroom management plan is a purposeful management system that directs a teacher in establishing the expectations of the learning environment. 

This plan, when implemented from Day One, encompasses not only how the teacher conducts instruction, but also how the students engage with the content and with their peers. As we all know, learning cannot happen when the environment is rowdy and disorganized.

Why is a classroom management plan important?

A classroom management plan enables educators to set clear expectations for students, establish classroom norms, and define consequences for disruptive behavior.

Let’s dive into each.

Setting Expectations

Creating a systemic process for classroom community development is vital to learning. The collaborative approach to developing the classroom management plan establishes the expectations for both the teacher and the learner. 

The plan defines how members will speak to each other, how work will be evaluated, and why instructions are viable for content mastery.

Establishing Classroom Norms

As a teacher, there needs to be a way of establishing what and how things will be done in class. There is a level of mutual understanding of where to place backpacks, when restroom time is after lunch, and who is the class line leader. 

It’s even more important to determine how the learning environment will be designed to foster engaging lessons. 

The plan incorporates how students interact during collaborative and/or independent learning activities and how to have healthy and respectful constructive debates.

Defining Consequences

Students and the teacher should collaborate on the establishment of class rules. By having a stake in the development of the rules, students are more inclined to hold themselves, as well as their classmates, to the enforcement of the class rules. 

Yet, the consequences should not be so punitive as to be unenforceable. In other words, do not create a rule that cannot be consistently enforced. Consequences should be reasonable, and student rewards should be offered for the long-term practice of the rules.

How to write a classroom management plan

Classroom management plans are often generated in collaboration with the teacher and students. There are countless things that need to be addressed in the creation of a classroom management plan. 

Some of those procedures and routines that need to be explained, practiced, and followed may be:

  • What to do if they need to sharpen a pencil
  • What to do during group or station time
  • How to speak respectfully to another classmate
  • Where to go during a fire drill
  • How to dispose of trash in the cafeteria
  • Where to place finished classwork
  • What do do when a visitor is in the classroom
  • What to do before being dismissed for the day
  • What to do when they wish to speak in class

Here is how a teacher might develop the classroom management plan for a safe and orderly classroom.

1. Establish the classroom rules.

First, establish the classroom rules. Have students identify three big rules that they feel are important. 

Talley the big three on the board and write them on chart paper or whiteboard. Have the students discuss before making these permanent class rules. 

Remember, rules may need to be changed depending on the situation. The rules that work in the school building may not work in a virtual setting. 

2. Establish the consequences.

Second, establish the consequences for following and not following the rules. Explain that the consequences are not meant to be punitive. Thus, consequences, such as moving to a new seat, reminders of the rules, conferences with counselors or parents, or a behavior contract, will vary depending on the infraction. 

3. Determine the rewards.

Third, determine the classroom rewards for following the rules.

Make it clear that students will be rewarded or recognized for adhering to the rules. 

Positive behavior interventions can be done via a thumbs-up, handshakes, positive praise, and high fives. They can also be material rewards or school events

There are even free rewards like teacher helper, lunch with a buddy, extra library time, and homework passes. If your school utilizes the PBIS Tiers or a token economy, then you can issue school bucks for rewards too. 

Having the whole class determine what they would like for outstanding behavior and rule practicing ensures their buy-in of the rules.

4. Determine how to monitor the rules.

Fourth, as a class, determine how to monitor the rules. Once established, the rules need to be posted in a place where all students can see them. This is a great self-monitoring tool for classroom behavior. 

The rules could be monitored through the use of a points tracking system. The system would monitor the number of days, weeks, or occurrences students are on task for specific rules. For example, every time a student speaks respectfully to another student during group work, the child earns a point. 

The teacher could also specify which rule will be targeted for the week. When students demonstrate the targeted rule, points would be awarded.

5. Develop an approach to handling behavior challenges.

Fifth, as the teacher, anticipate how to handle a behavioral problem before it escalates. This can be done by reviewing each students’ cumulative folder. Notice any key items such as days absent, any academic issues, IEP/ELL documents, and the like. 

Prepare a plan of action as to how to engage the students and their parents in creating a positive relationship for the year. Additionally, determine how you will manage these concerns in your classroom. 

Formulate two to three classroom management strategies to de-escalate the issue. Most importantly, do not get into power struggles with students and do not adjudicate student discipline in front of other students.

Classroom Management Plan Example 

Classroom management plans do not need to be elaborate. For example, here are a few rules that demonstrate the use of the classroom management plan.

1. Rule: Students should not speak while the teacher is talking. 

This collaborative rule calls for each student to either self-monitor or peer monitor the behavior. If another student corrects a peer, there should be an established criterion as to how this is done. For example, a student says to another, “the rule says not to talk while the teacher is talking, remember?” or “You are not following Rule number 3.” 

The teacher may respond to a student in the same manner. Practicing and role-playing how to say this kind of rule reinforcement is also needed to deflect peer-to-peer conflicts.

classroom management plan

2. Rule: Students turn in their completed work in the correct bins. 

The teacher might develop a plan where students submit their assignments in a purple bin, labeled by subject, on the back counter. 

The teacher would give instructions and demonstrate how this should be done. The instructions might include that the students, either individually or the first person in their row, take the paper, and deposit it in the purple bin. Having each student practice the procedure reinforces the policy. 

Additionally, clearly repeating this instruction allows students to recall the expectation.

3. Rule: Students are to put their names on their papers. 

The teacher may demonstrate how the paper should be headed. Placing this example in the room where all students can see it also reinforces the procedure. If a student does not put his/her name on the paper, the teacher will demonstrate what will happen to the paper for a student to claim it.

For example, the teacher might put it on the whiteboard with a question mark, or the work might be placed in a special space on the bulletin board labeled, “Is This Yours?”. Students are then able to reclaim their work and resubmit it for teacher review.

Your Classroom Management Plan

Classroom management plans allow the teacher and the students the ability to have a collegial and orderly learning setting. 

When the instructional environment is scripted to account for designed classroom expectations and potential instruction threats, optimum engagement can occur. Thus, the learning journey is more enjoyable and rewarding. For more resources you can check out our other classroom management rules or classroom management examples. You can also further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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