5 Effective Classroom Management Models

Explore commonly used Classroom Management Models that work.
By 
Katie Neumeier
 | 
November 2, 2022

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

Think about your own classroom or a classroom you have been in before. How was it run? What was the overall feel? How were the students and teachers interacting? What was the primary focus in the room; academics or behavior?

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

quote icon

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

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About the Event

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

Register Now

About the Event

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

About the Presenter

Katherine Neumeier has spent the last 8 years in education working with Title I schools to build strong classroom practices and close academic gaps with English Language Learners and Special Populations. She has taught across multiple grade levels as well as coached educators, served as a reading specialist, and built an intervention program from the ground up. Integrating EdTech platforms as well as utilizing behavior management tools such as Liveschool have transformed and supported her role as an educator. She earned a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's University and a M.Ed from The University of St. Thomas.

Think about your own classroom or a classroom you have been in before. How was it run? What was the overall feel? How were the students and teachers interacting? What was the primary focus in the room; academics or behavior?

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

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Learn more about the author, 
Katie Neumeier
 

Think about your own classroom or a classroom you have been in before. How was it run? What was the overall feel? How were the students and teachers interacting? What was the primary focus in the room; academics or behavior?

If any of your answers included words like chaotic, loud, overwhelming, anxious, or unfriendly, you are in the right spot. Classroom Management is no easy task! Reflecting and reworking our classroom management model, styles, and strategies is important and will make us even better educators. 

Classroom Management 101 

Let’s back up for a second. 

Classroom Management is the set of strategies used to create and maintain a safe and inclusive space where all students can learn. Successful management does not happen by accident. Students are explicitly taught what positive behaviors are and how to work together to meet the expectations. 

To make management less complex, teachers establish strong relationships and boundaries with their students. They are patient and consistent while expectations are being taught and reinforced daily. 

So where does “good” classroom management come from? How can it be taught and utilized? 

In short, schools should be using a research-based management model in the classroom to meet the needs of all students (and educators). 

Choosing an appropriate model is half the battle because not every model functions or can be used in the same way. 

Why Use a Management Model? 

Classroom Management models are the foundation for educators to build on at the school-wide and classroom level. Typically, one or two models are adopted and used across the entire school to create consistency for students and teachers as they grow year to year. Without consistency, things can get out of hand pretty quickly.

There is no “one size fits all” approach. Some models were created with certain student behaviors in mind while others are more comprehensive. A comprehensive model will help to address a spectrum of disruptive behavior, which is what you are up against in a typical public school setting. 

In essence, different models serve different needs. 

Once a model(s) is chosen, teachers should then fill their tool belts with a variety of effective, research-based strategies to support student behavior within the model. 

Let’s explore some commonly used models that may work perfectly for your campus or individual classroom. 

Classroom Management Models 

classroom management models infographic

Logical Consequences 

Theory: This model was created by Rudolf Dreikurs, an Austrian psychiatrist and educator. He believed that student behavior is the direct consequence of not having certain needs met within their environments. 

His theory also says that all students strive to be socially recognized and accepted by the adults and peers in their lives. When/If students are not recognized and have their social needs met, they tend to act out. 

How it works: This model is based on the use of predetermined and understood consequences for behavior. As indicated by the model name, the consequences are not randomly given, they are logical and match the negative behavior. 

Most importantly, students know beforehand what the consequence of their actions will be. In addition, teachers can support their students in gaining acceptance from others by narrating positive behaviors, modeling, and having conversations about self-control.

A key idea of this model is that discipline is not punishment. Our positive and negative actions both lead to consequences. 

Logical Consequence Example 

Action: Bill trips another student at recess or in the hall. 

Logical Consequence: Bill writes an apology note explaining why he is sorry and makes a plan for what he will do differently in the future to keep himself and others safe.

Assertive Discipline - Lee & Marlene Canter 

Theory: This model is a direct and positive approach developed by Lee and Marlene Canter. It states that desirable behaviors should receive positive reinforcement and recognition while on the flip side, undesirable behaviors should receive negative consequences. 

When effectively and consistently used, students will begin to associate desired behaviors with rewards which should increase the frequency of these behaviors. 

How it works: Assertive Discipline goes hand in hand with PBIS, which is all about positively supporting students and using rewards as a reinforcement tool. 

You use this model to be clear and concise with students as well as hold them accountable for their actions. The Assertive Discipline Model has 5 steps. 

1.) Recognize and remove negative expectations of students (aka be fair) 

2.) Practice assertive response strategies (Ex. set clear expectations, use reasonable consequences for actions, remain calm and direct) 

3.) Set limits and boundaries 

4.) Stay consistent and follow through (this goes for rewards and consequences) 

5.) Implement a system for positive reinforcement (this is where PBIS fits in) 

Beyond Discipline 

Theory: This model by Alfie Kohn is innovative in the sense that it challenges the relevance of rules and expectations. It goes against what we typically think of in terms of ‘classroom management. 

The model is characterized by the 3 C’s; content, community, and choice. Kohn believes that if you focus on the 3 C’s, rather than reward systems, classroom management is not a problem. 

How it works: To use this model, teachers should provide students with relevant learning tasks, opportunities to build community through relationships and teamwork, and the freedom to make choices.

Creating a safe learning environment will facilitate learning and help students to not be fearful of making mistakes. By focusing on the 3 C’s, you can transform your class culture, teach students responsibility, and promote self-reflection.

The Glasser Model 

Theory: Named after the American psychiatrist William Glasser, this model was forged from the idea that good behavior comes from good choices. It goes beyond teacher imposed discipline and is for students in classrooms that already have overall “good behavior”. 

This model would fit perfectly in a classroom that has adopted morning meetings as part of its SEL curriculum or classroom procedure. 

How it works: For this model, teachers would explicitly teach class rules and plan a variety of lessons to teach students how to make rational and positive choices. If positive choices are made, positive consequences are available. 

If negative choices are made, students are taught to be reflective and explain how they would change their behavior for the future. In this model, excuses are not tolerated. Students use classroom meetings to openly discuss problems, solutions, and character development. 

Positive-Discipline Model 

Theory: This model is also called the Fred Jones Model (after its’ creator). It is based on the idea that teachers are most effective when there is a balance of positive student behavior, learner motivation, and an incentive system in place. 

This model works well because it incorporates many of the high-leverage classroom management strategies teachers are already using. 

How it works: Jones created this model from his observations of highly effective teachers and the strategies they use that actually work. It is comprehensive in the sense that it flows naturally with PBIS and incorporates the explicit teaching of rules, positive reinforcement, point or reward systems, and building classroom culture. 

Additionally, using positive body language helps to re-engage learners and incentive systems act as an extrinsic motivator as students learn that with positive choices come positive rewards. 

Which Classroom Management Model Will You Choose?

Using a specific model for classroom management is not the end all be all. What it will offer you though are a starting place and a foundation. It is then up to you to strategically choose the systems, routines, and practices that fit best for you and your learners. If you teach older students you may want to check out high school classroom management.

Effective classroom management strategies within these models will offer you the support you need to create the best possible environment for your students.

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