7 Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

Being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in the classroom.
By 
Becky Thal
 | 
September 30, 2022

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

Classroom management is a philosophy, as well as a set of strategies and actions, that a teacher adopts to ensure his/her students are progressing academically, socially, emotionally, and behaviorally.

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

quote icon

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

No items found.

About the Event

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

Register Now

About the Event

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

About the Presenter

Becky Thal currently works as an edtech consultant in the field of marketing. Previous roles have included 5th grade math/science teacher and advertising executive. Becky is active in many online communities, as well as her local community. She is always open to collaborating on new projects! In her spare time, Becky enjoys trips to the beach, trying new restaurants, and attending her kids’ various sports games and events. She lives with her husband, three children, and Labradoodle, in New Jersey.

Classroom management is a philosophy, as well as a set of strategies and actions, that a teacher adopts to ensure his/her students are progressing academically, socially, emotionally, and behaviorally.

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Career Day
Grades 3-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Firebird of the Month
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Recess
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
🎉
👑
🎁
Stairway Messages
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Serenade
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Wristband
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Gift Cards
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Food-Themed Party
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Silent Disco
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Food-Themed Party
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Becky Thal
 

Classroom management is a philosophy, as well as a set of strategies and actions, that a teacher adopts to ensure his/her students are progressing academically, socially, emotionally, and behaviorally.

Different teachers will have different classroom management styles. No matter your style, however, being able to maintain a sense of order is what enables all students to thrive in their learning environment.

Effective Classroom Management Strategies for New Teachers

I took an informal poll, asking both new teachers (1-3 years experience) and veteran teachers (3+ years experience) what the best advice they’ve given or received has been regarding classroom management. 

Below is a compilation of responses that will serve as effective classroom management strategies for new teachers. 

1. Relationships Matter

The top response I received, from both newbies and veterans alike, was that relationships matter. 

In fact, one teacher actually suggested applying the 2 x 10 strategy - spend 2 minutes each day, for 10 days, with a specific student, just getting to know them. While I think this is a great guideline to use, I also don’t think it needs to be that formal. 

The point is that what you give out into the universe - or at least your classroom - is what you’ll get back. If you spend time building a good rapport and developing mutual trust and respect with all of your students, classroom management will become nearly effortless. 

And when I say “all of your students,” I mean all - even the ones who might seem difficult to bond with.

We often forget that the love, kindness, and respect we may be used to in our own lives is unfortunately not what everyone is experiencing. Oftentimes, behaviors are manifestations of what is - or isn’t - happening at home or outside of school. 

Kids need adults to show them that they care. Sometimes teachers are the only adults in a child’s life that are in a place to do that. 

2. Ask For Student Voice

Classroom management is not about you, the teacher, controlling the class - at least not in the traditional sense. It’s not about kids sitting quietly, diligently working at their desks. Classrooms should be looked at more like a partnership than a dictatorship. You want the students to understand the what and why behind how things are run in your classroom, in an effort to gain their buy-in.

Not every student may be on board, or even agree with all of your policies and procedures, but you do need them to respect the process. One way to do this is by including them as much as possible in decisions that are made regarding things like classroom rules. Decide ahead of time what your non-negotiables are, as well as the things you are willing to compromise on. If students feel they have been included in the process and decision-making, they are much more inclined to cooperate and follow those rules. 

3. Pick Your Battles

Let’s face facts - most students are not going to have a pencil when they come to class. Some may argue that with so much work done on the computer these days, is there really a need for students to have something to write with at all times? As a former math teacher, I can tell you yes! But I decided many years ago that it was just not a battle I felt was worth fighting anymore. I decided to keep a stash of pencils readily available and easily accessible for anyone who needed one. I even had a contest to incentivize those who kept the same pencil! 

A lot of times being able to step back, reflect, and reframe our thinking is what can lead to the most beneficial results for everyone. So choose ahead of time what you think is worth fighting for, and what you are willing to let go of. This is especially true when it comes to high school classroom management.

4. Consistency is Key

Whether they realize it or not, children thrive on routine. Granted, they may not like all routines, but they quickly come to understand what to expect from their teachers. This not only applies to classroom procedures and lesson structure, but to rewards and consequences too. When teachers are consistent, there are no surprises. Don’t get me wrong - there are always extenuating circumstances where you will have to break the routine, but in these cases, students are keenly aware that this is an anomaly. 

Consistency is beneficial for many reasons, including the mental well-being of you as the teacher. Adults thrive on consistency as much as the kids do. It helps keep us organized and on pace and creates a sense of comfort. Consistency should apply to teaching practices and learning space, as much as it does general classroom behavior and expectations. 

4. Firm but Fair 

Think about the teachers you had who you respected the most and wanted to work the hardest for. You knew there were boundaries, but you also knew it wasn’t a “my way or the highway” type of situation. I’ve heard veteran teachers say to new teachers, “Don’t smile in class before winter break” in an effort to make the students understand you mean business. While this is severe, and will certainly not make students feel welcome or safe in your presence, you also don’t need to go to the opposite extreme and be overly amicable.

Teachers who are “firm” are really teachers that maintain the consistency that was discussed earlier. But they are also the teachers who recognize there are exceptions to rules and sometimes they need to bend a little in an effort to be “fair.” Teachers who are too friendly, or bend the rules too much, can easily be viewed as pushovers. This is when classroom management can become problematic. It’s a fine line, but you can stand your ground and hold your students accountable, while still maintaining good relationships with them. Remember that not everyone is going to like how you run your classroom, and that’s fine - you just need them to respect it.

5. Keep Families on Your Side

As you work on developing relationships with students, work on doing this with their families as well. Getting buy-in from families is one of the most effective classroom management strategies you can implement. After all, you are on the same team - you both want what’s best for the student. And when the student knows you are operating as a team, they are less likely to pit one against the other. 

Get off on the right foot by making your initial outreach to families a positive one. Send personal emails or make phone calls home with an uplifting message about each student. Continue to periodically maintain this personal type of correspondence, while also sending more general classroom communication home in the form of a newsletter or video message. You might also choose to maintain social media accounts for your classroom, which families love to follow. No matter what methods of communication you choose, make families feel like they are included. This will make any potentially difficult conversations you have to have at a later date a little easier.

6. Don’t Take Anything Personally

This can be a tough one, especially for new teachers. You will encounter numerous adults and kids every day, each with their own unique personality, and each with their own story. Sometimes the slightest event or encounter can change a person’s mood almost instantly. And even if the circumstances have nothing to do with you, sometimes you can feel like you’re taking the brunt. 

As the saying goes, “Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about…” Oftentimes when students or adults act up or lash out, there is usually something else that is driving that disruptive behavior. It is unlikely that you can help or control it. But the first step in maintaining your own mental well-being is not to take these things personally - even when they seem very personal. 

7. Be Reflective

Like all things related to classroom management models, procedures, and management, one of the best things you can do is be reflective. This applies to new teachers as well as veteran teachers. 

Is what you’re doing effective? Do kids seem to be thriving? Are there parts of your classroom management strategy that you may need to reconsider? 

These are all questions to regularly ponder. Keep in mind that just because something worked well at one time, or for one group of students, doesn’t mean it will continue to be effective. 

Being willing to try new strategies and new classroom management models no matter how many years you’ve been teaching, is a perfect example of having a growth mindset. 

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Game-Based Simulation Learning
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Lost & Found Fashion Show
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holiday Classroom Carousel
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Wristband
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Book

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
“Let's Make A Difference Week"
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
The Love Soiree
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Dance
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Wild ‘N Out High School Edition
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Decades Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
The A-List
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Awards Show Afterparty
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Meet the Teacher
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Tutor
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Design the Bulletin Board
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Drop Lowest Quiz
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Teacher for the Day
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Hat Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Becky Thal
 

Subscribe via Email

Receive the best school culture resources monthly to inspire your planning.

Related Resources

-