How to Create a Classroom Management Philosophy + Examples

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.
By 
Becky Thal
 | 
April 18, 2022

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

Typically in every teacher preparation program, you are asked to construct a philosophy of education statement to add to your portfolio. What you may or may not include within that statement is your beliefs about classroom management.

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

quote icon

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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About the Event

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

Register Now

About the Event

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

About the Presenter

Becky Thal currently works as an edtech consultant in the field of marketing. Previous roles have included 5th grade math/science teacher and advertising executive. Becky is active in many online communities, as well as her local community. She is always open to collaborating on new projects! In her spare time, Becky enjoys trips to the beach, trying new restaurants, and attending her kids’ various sports games and events. She lives with her husband, three children, and Labradoodle, in New Jersey.

Typically in every teacher preparation program, you are asked to construct a philosophy of education statement to add to your portfolio. What you may or may not include within that statement is your beliefs about classroom management.

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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Learn more about the author, 
Becky Thal
 

Typically in every teacher preparation program, you are asked to construct a philosophy of education statement to add to your portfolio. What you may or may not include within that statement is your beliefs about classroom management.

One could argue, however, that your classroom management philosophy is just as important - if not more important - than your general philosophy of education. After all, being able to manage a classroom effectively is key to creating an environment where all learners can thrive.

Whether you are a brand new teacher or a twenty-year veteran, it’s never too late to construct your classroom management philosophy. Many people might not think of teachers as “managers.” But teachers actually have more management responsibilities than most corporate managers, because of the many different hats they wear. 

Therefore, it’s important to create a plan for how you will carry out your managerial responsibilities in order to make your job easier and ensure the success of yourself and your students.

What is a Classroom Management Philosophy?

Classroom management philosophy encompasses the principles, approaches, and beliefs that inform our classroom management models. This includes the routines, rules, and standards we use to regulate disruptive behavior and create productive learning environments. 

Creating a Classroom Management Philosophy

When constructing your classroom management philosophy, think about your classroom management style. 

Do you like to maintain more control? Or are you happy to give students more freedom? Think about your goals for the year, and what kind of relationship you want to have with your students. What kind of classroom climate and school culture are you striving for? 

Try to connect your classroom management philosophy with your “why,” or your general philosophy of education.

Think of your philosophy as a brief, but purposeful and reflective essay. Include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. 

Where possible, cite research (the more recent the better) that supports your philosophy. 

Include your beliefs about teaching and learning in the classroom, your feelings about the teacher role versus the student role, and what your classroom management strategies and plans are for achieving the goals you’ve established. 

When you are happy with the philosophy essay you’ve created, don’t be shy about sharing it with all stakeholders - including your students. It illustrates the amount of time, thought, and consideration you’ve given to it.

Classroom Management Philosophy Examples

For inspiration, the following are classroom management examples. Keep in mind that your philosophy should be unique to you. No two philosophies should be exactly the same. The following are examples of excerpts you might consider using in your essay.

Example 1.

I want all students to feel safe and cared for. I want them to feel this is “our” classroom - not “my” classroom.

Example 2.

I believe all children deserve to feel comfortable in their learning space. I will provide as much flexibility as possible, in terms of seating and movement, to accommodate their individual needs.

Example 3.

Whenever possible, students will be given “voice & choice” in terms of activities and assessment options. If students feel they have a say in their learning, they will be more cooperative and willing to engage.

Example 4.

Students should feel like they are part of a community in my classroom. But like any community, there are rules that need to be followed in order for everyone to function at their fullest potential.

Example 5.

Students will be included in the creation of our classroom rules. Together we will create a “Classroom Constitution” which all the students will sign to show their agreement with. The Constitution will be displayed prominently in our classroom.

Example 6.

My role as a teacher is to be a facilitator of learning. I want my students to make authentic discoveries on their own. I believe this will lead to more meaningful connections that will ultimately encourage my students to see themselves as life-long learners.

Students will understand the expectations and responsibilities involved with group projects. They will be held accountable for their individual contributions.

Example 7.

Students should feel free to voice their opinions, concerns, and suggestions in my class, without fear of repercussions. I will have a locked box in my classroom where students can leave me notes to let me know what’s on their minds at any point in time.

Example 8.

I want students to know I care about their mental well-being. I will incorporate daily check-ins via Google Form as a way to identify potential problems and concerns.

Keeping Your Classroom Management Philosophy Updated

Like all things in education, you should periodically come back and revisit your classroom management philosophy. When you do, take time to reflect on whether you feel you’ve adhered to this philosophy or not. If you haven’t, why do you think this is the case?

You may find that over time, and with a variety of experiences, your thoughts and classroom management ideas change. If this is the case, it’s perfectly fine to revise and update parts or all of your philosophy. 

By going back and reviewing it, you are reminding yourself of your core beliefs, which may be particularly necessary during challenging times. 

However, no matter what your classroom management philosophy is, remember to be consistent when executing classroom management rules with your students. Consistency is always key to success. 

Don't forget to further your research by checking out our list of the best classroom management articles.

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Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Student Messenger
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Teacher Serenade
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Wristband
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Assist the Custodian.
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
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Learn more about the author, 
Becky Thal
 

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