10 Completely Free Rewards For Your Classroom

You need a free way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a reward system.
By 
Jordan Pruitt
 | 
November 23, 2022

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

The best classes are the most engaged classes. Student engagement is a direct indicator of student learning.

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

quote icon

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

No items found.

About the Event

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

Register Now

About the Event

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

About the Presenter

Jordan resides in Lexington, Kentucky. He has experience in Public Education as an Administrator, Science Teacher, and as a Coach. He has extensive experience with School Discipline, PBIS, SEL, Restorative Practices, MTSS, and Trauma-Informed Care.

The best classes are the most engaged classes. Student engagement is a direct indicator of student learning.

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Karaoke Night
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher v Student Competition
Grades 6-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trip to the Treasure Box
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher for the Day
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Firebird of the Month
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Sweatshirt
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Partner Work
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Family Feast
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Backpack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Serenade
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
🎉
👑
🎁
Hat Pass
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
🎉
👑
🎁
Line Leader
🎉
👑
🎁
Locker Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
🎉
👑
🎁
Tutor
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Bonfire
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
TikTok with the Teacher
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher for the Day
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Food-Themed Party
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Sweatshirt
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
STEM Field Day
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Loudspeaker Shoutout
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
Grades K-12
Student
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert
Grades 6-8
Class/House
Privilege
Free

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Movie Posters
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Early Lunch Dismissal
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Create the Seating Chart
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Locker Choice
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Student Spotlight Board
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Jordan Pruitt
 

The best classes are the most engaged classes. Student engagement is a direct indicator of student learning.

This is why many, many professional development products are built around engagement activities. Kagan is one example. As professionals in the field, teachers know the importance of engagement in their classes. 

You plan lessons around the idea of attention getters or you start classes with a “hook” similar to a good book. You tie concepts to real-world ideas so students can anchor the ideas to their own experiences. 

You say things multiple ways. Sometimes using multiple forms of media. I have an English teacher friend who has used as many as 10 different versions of Romeo and Juliet when he teaches Shakespeare. Teachers value engagement. 

But all of that effort is sometimes ineffective. The perfect lesson wasted. The great opening hook sails right over their heads like a comedian bombing on opening night. The real-world tie-ins just aren’t strong enough to grab their attention. 

So what can you do? 

What do other professions do when customers or employees seem disinterested or unengaged? They put on their marketing caps and find a way to incentivize and reward the participation they are seeking. 

Reward the behaviors you want to see, and you’ll see those more often. 

So What Are Classroom Rewards?

No need to overthink this. You have behaviors, actions, and achievements you value in your classroom. You need to see those as much as possible to get the level of engagement you need for your students to learn. 

You set expectations. Teach them very clearly in a manner so that all your students know them beyond a shadow of a doubt. You also need to tie rewards to meeting those standards in class. 

These could be tangible and be in the form of goods you purchase with a budgeted amount. But most of us don’t have that in the budget. So we need great rewards at the best possible price. 

We need free rewards. 

Why have Classroom Rewards?

As we discussed before, engagement is crucial in the learning process. There is plenty of research out there on how people learn. 

Most of it says something along these lines; We enter into the process with preconceptions, and interest must then be drummed up. Once our interest has been established we can interact with the new skill or idea. 

Then we start to integrate or organize the new knowledge with our pre-existing base of knowledge. From there we apply the knowledge or skills to cement as part of our new baseline.

What is the most important part of that process? No easy answer to that question. From my own personal experience, I find that none of that process is possible without the interest that leads to the interaction with the new skill or knowledge. 

In other words, we need some level of motivation to learn. Just because I am presented with the information it takes to be a cross-country skier or to become a world-class violin player doesn’t mean I will engage with that information. There has to be some motivation to do so, either internally or externally.

In your classroom, you will find some students with internal motivation. You will find some subjects that are more easily tied to internal motivators. But not always, and depending on your subject or grade level you might find that internal motivation is even rare in your students. 

You need an easy, cheap way to include external motivation in your classroom. You need a free classroom reward system. Keep reading for some ideas you can use in your class!

10 Absolutely Free Rewards

1. Competition

This one is a bit odd because the actual reward here is irrelevant. If I felt any subject or lesson was going to be a bit stale, I would include some way for my kids to compete. 

The competition itself was the reward, it provided enough intrigue to keep students engaged regardless of what I offered the “winner”. 

2. Status

Sometimes status is a motivator for us. For adults, it could be the car you drive, the job title you have, or the neighborhood you live in. 

For kids, it might be as simple as being the line leader or getting to eat lunch with their teacher! Many of us thrive when we get an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

3. Location

This one could be individual seating assignments. It could also be whole group rewards like taking the class outside for a nature walk or finding an alternative location to hold class.

Free Classroom Reward Example

4. Time

Time is probably the most valuable resource we have. Teachers who have had to cover due to a sub shortage and hold conferences after school hours or attend a.m. meetings certainly know the value of time. 

Our kids know it as well. Reward them with some free time or screen time if they meet your expectations. 

5. Choice

Build opportunities for student choice into your lessons or extensions. In my Science Lab, I kept my “Big Box of STEM” in the back of the room. In the box, I kept sandwich bags with materials and short directions/challenges on creating something or solving a problem using the materials. 

It made for easy extensions and a way to reward students who reached proficiency or mastery on a standard.

6. Praise

Make this a part of your routine. Shoot for 4 positive interactions to every 1 negative redirection. Look for the positive! Be creative in your praise as well. Verbal is great. Written is better. Posted in a spot their peers can see the praise is best.

Free Classroom Reward Example

7. Music

Reward your class with some appropriate background tunes if they meet expectations. 

8. Recognition

Your school may do a student of the month. There isn’t any reason you can’t do the same in your room every week. 

Add a positive phone call to parents to this one and it may have the most impact of any on this list.

Free Classroom Reward Example

9. Spotlight

Allow students to earn some floor time to tell a joke, read a story, or share a bit of their unique culture.

10. Community

Want tangible free rewards? Reach out to your local community and ask for donations. Tell them exactly who it is for and what you're hoping to achieve. 

You’ll be surprised at the level of support your school has that may be going untapped.

Free Classroom Reward Example

The Right Mindset

You may notice some common threads in the list. Joy. Good vibes. Those are great rewards for elementary, middle, or high. You are trying to create an environment where learning can thrive. 

Make it fun! Remember you want your students to have a “want to” attitude, not a “have to” attitude towards your classroom.

All Reward Ideas for Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Pen Pouch
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Old School Cookout
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Technology
Grades 6-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch With the Teacher
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Art Contest
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Toys
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Emcee the Announcements
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY

All Reward Ideas for Elementary School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Sports Tickets
Grades 3-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Books
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Picnic Lunch
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Holidays Around the World
Grades K-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Supplies & Merch
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Seating Choice
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Serenade
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Free Dress
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Dress Up or Down Day
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Event Ideas for Schools

All Free Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
🎉
👑
🎁
Line Leader
🎉
👑
🎁
Dance Party
🎉
👑
🎁
Operate Equipment.
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Reading Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Recess
🎉
👑
🎁
Camp Read Away
🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
🎉
👑
🎁
Lunch Concert

All Reward Ideas for High School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Glow Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
School Assembly
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
♟️Chess With the Principal
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Ice Cream Sundae Party
Grades K-12
Class/House
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Play Games
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Fake The Funk
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Anime Themed Party
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Blood Drive
Grades 9-12
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Kickback Vibes
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Amazing Race
Grades 9-12
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Movie Night
Grades 9-12
Student
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Be a Comedian.
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Reward Ideas for Middle School Students

🎉
👑
🎁
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Jobs
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Talk Time
Grades 6-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Graduation Celebration
Grades 6-12
School
Event
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Theme Party
Grades K-8
Class/House
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Read Across America
Grades K-8
School
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Special Screening
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Career Day
Grades 3-12
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Class Pet
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Deluxe
🎉
👑
🎁
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snack Pack
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
School Spirit Day
Grades K-12
School
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Trunk or Treat
Grades K-8
School
Event
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY

All Student Reward & Incentive Ideas

💰
🎨
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Parking Spots
Grades 9-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Special Pen
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Silly Science Experiments
Grades K-5
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Board Game Party
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Video Game Rewards
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Pie a Teacher
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Stickers
Grades K-8
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Sweatshirt
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Deluxe
💰
🎨
Tech Time
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Snacks
Grades K-12
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Line Leader
Grades K-5
Student
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
💰
🎨
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
💰
🎨
Homework Pass
Grades 6-12
Student
Privilege
Free

All Virtual Reward Ideas for Schools

🎉
👑
🎁
Morning Meeting Leader
Grades 3-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Positive Note or Call Home
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Host a Virtual Party. 🎶
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Extra Computer Games
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Show & Tell
Grades K-8
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Podcast
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Brain Break
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Certificate of Achievement
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Field Trip
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Teacher Q&A
Grades K-12
Class/House
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Virtual Talent Show. 🎤
Grades 3-12
Class/House
Event
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Classroom DJ
Grades K-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Social Media Reporter
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Free
🎉
👑
🎁
Donate $1
Grades 3-12
Student
Privilege
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Stickers
Grades K-5
Student
Tangible
Low Cost/DIY
🎉
👑
🎁
Digital Escape Rooms
Grades 6-12
Class/House
Privilege
Deluxe
See all Rewards

Want more ideas?

Rewards that Rock 🎸 has 100+ rewards, incentives, and event ideas to build your school culture.
Find Rewards
Learn more about the author, 
Jordan Pruitt
 

Subscribe via Email

Receive the best school culture resources monthly to inspire your planning.

Related Resources

-